Implantation Bleeding: What are the signs (Photos)

implantation bleeding

What is implantation bleeding? Many women are not sure what this term means. Implantation bleeding is a common sign of early pregnancy. It occurs when the fertilized egg implants in the uterus. About 20% of pregnant women experience implantation bleeding. If you are wondering if you might be pregnant, here are some signs and symptoms to watch for!

What is implantation bleeding?

Implantation bleeding is a type of spotting or bleeding that occurs seven to fourteen days after conception. This happens when the fertilized egg implants in the lining of the uterus. Implantation is a crucial step in pregnancy, as it is when the embryo begins to develop. Usually, implantation bleeding is pink or rusty brown, with a light flow and no clotting, lasting one to three days and accompanied by other symptoms.

For some women, implantation bleeding can be very light spotting or even just a few drops of blood. Others may experience heavier bleeding, which can last for a few days.

Implantation bleeding is a normal and common occurrence in early pregnancy. f you experience implantation bleeding, try to relax and rest as much as possible. Drink plenty of fluids and avoid strenuous activity. However, if you are concerned about the bleeding, or if it is heavy or lasts for more than a few days, you should consult your doctor.

When does implantation bleeding happen?

You will likely begin bleeding after fertilization or conception, usually seven to ten days sooner than your monthly period. Implantation is a crucial step in pregnancy, as it is when the embryo begins to develop.

What does implantation bleeding look like and what are the signs

Implantation bleeding may appear or look like spots – blood that appears when you wipe – or as a light, a consistent flow that requires a pad. If the bleeding consists of blood that is mixed with cervical mucus, you may need to use a pad.

The following are some of the symptoms of implantation bleeding:

  • Some women claim that light bleeding or spotting differs from usual period flow because the blood is darker.
  • Minor cramping may also occur.
  • Feeling woozy.
  • The breasts feel swollen.
  • Having a headache.

What should I do if I experience implantation bleeding?

If you experience implantation bleeding, try to relax and rest as much as possible. Drink plenty of fluids and avoid strenuous activity. However, if you are concerned about the bleeding, or if it is heavy or lasts for more than a few days, you should consult your doctor.

Implantation bleeding vs. period bleeding: How to tell the difference

There’s no way to detect the difference between implantation bleeding and period bleeding, unfortunately. Implantation bleeding and period bleeding can both cause light spotting or heavy bleeding. Implantation bleeding is usually much lighter than a menstrual period. It may be pink or brown, and it is often accompanied by light cramping.

Wait a few more days and take a pregnancy test to see whether you’re pregnant. You might also be able to figure it out by looking at when you last had sex. It’s unlikely that any spotting you’re experiencing is due to implantation bleeding if it’s been more than two weeks.

If you are concerned about the bleeding, or if it is heavy or lasts for more than a few days, you should consult your doctor.

Ovulation bleeding vs implantation bleeding: How to tell the difference

Ovulation bleeding occurs when an egg leaves your ovary, and implantation bleeding occurs when a fertilized egg adheres to the uterine lining.

In the first trimester of pregnancy, about a quarter of women experience some spotting, which can include implantation bleeding.

How long after ovulation does implantation bleeding occur?

For an egg to be fertilized, it must be fertilized within 24 hours of its release from the ovary, and then implantation must occur 7 to 14 days later.

It’s easy to confuse implantation bleeding with the start of your menstruation, but it’s a much lighter flow of blood that lasts for a half-day to two days.

In addition, instead of the bright red blood of your period, the blood will resemble ovulation bleeding (brown, reddish, or pink).

Can Implantation bleeding cause clots?

Implantation bleeding doesn’t usually cause clots. Menstrual bleeding or heavier flow is what typically causes clotting.

Let your doctor know if you notice clots in your blood that otherwise meet the bill for implantation bleeding. Clots can indicate a miscarriage, especially if the bleeding is minimal, as it is during implantation.

Implantation bleeding pictures(photos)

Here are some implantaion bleeding photo’s from average woman and they’re experience.

implantaion bleeding photo-03 implantaion bleeding photo-01 implantaion bleeding photo

When to call the doctor

It’s common to experience light bleeding throughout pregnancy, even if it’s not during the time of implantation. Simple things like the discomfort of the cervix after a pelvic check, intercourse, or a vaginal infection can be the cause.

However, because bleeding after a positive pregnancy test might be an indication of ectopic pregnancy, molar pregnancy, or other early miscarriage, you should always contact your doctor if you have it so you can discuss any other symptoms. However, try not to be overly concerned. If the bleeding is minor and does not linger long, there is a strong chance that everything will be fine.

During the first several weeks and months of pregnancy, a variety of factors might cause bleeding. “Bleeding during early pregnancy can range from the discomfort of the cervix and vaginal area as blood flow increases to potential miscarriage or even ectopic pregnancy,” adds Cackovic. If you’ve had bleeding and a positive pregnancy test, it’s critical to contact your doctor as soon as possible to figure out what’s going on.

When you’re actively trying to conceive, it’s natural to question your reproductive system’s inner workings and even compare your symptoms to those of other women. But keep in mind that you may or may not experience implantation bleeding, and your experience may differ from that of others. The tough element is figuring out whether the spotting is due to implantation or something else (like your period). Take a big breath, monitor for additional bleeding, and consider taking a test in a few days if you’re on pins and needles waiting for an answer. Of course, if you have any concerns, don’t hesitate to contact your doctor.

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